Senior Years Program Information

Senior Years Credit System

 Graduation Requirements

 

Manitoba Education, Training and Youth requires that students accumulate a minimum of 30 credits for graduation from the Senior Years (Grade 9 -12).  However, the majority of our students graduate with distinction, that is, having achieved at least 32 credits.  Students at St. Paul’s Collegiate may earn their high school diploma by fulfilling the requirements of the English program,  the French Immersion program, or the Senior Years Technology Program. Our students may also take advantage of three other programs offered:

1)  Senior Year Apprenticeship Option  – whereby a student may earn up to 8 credits towards his/her Senior Years diploma and may also receive credit for having completed as much as the first level of an  apprenticeship training program.

2)  Career Internship – involves students in Grade11/12 and provides students an opportunity to gain work experience in a career of their interest. Students can earn up to eight (8) Internship credits.

These programs are outlined in greater detail in this handbook.   Further information can also be obtained by contacting the teacher coordinator of these programs:

 

High School Apprenticeship Option – Mr. Verras

Career Internship – Mr. Verras

Distance Education – Mr. Godbout

Career Counsellor – Mr. Houde

French Immersion –  Mr. Houde

Principal – Mr. Godbout       jfgodbout@prsdmb.ca

 

 

GUIDE TO THE NUMBERING SYSTEM

First Character:             Second Character:

1 – Grade 9                   0 – developed or approved by Manitoba Education for 1 credit

2 – Grade 10                 5 – developed or approved by Manitoba Education for 1/2 credit

3  – Grade 11                 1 – developed by school/division: School Initiated Course (SIC)

4 – Grade 12                 1 – developed by student with teacher supervision: Student Initiated Project (SIP)

 

Third Character:

F – Foundation —— foundation (groundwork) course experience for all students

G – General  ———- general education experience for all students

S – Specialized —— learning experiences leading to further studies at post-secondary

M – Modified ——— course has been modified for student who has special needs

(must meet Provincial Education Guidelines)

 

Table of Contents

(click subject area to navigate directly)

Senior Years Programs

I     English Program

II    French Immersion Program

III   Senior Years Technology Education Program

IV  Career & Technology Studies

V   High School Apprenticeship Option

 

Senior Years Course Descriptions

    Language Arts/ Français

    Mathematics/ Mathématiques

    Science/ Sciences de la Nature

    Social Studies/ Sciences Humaines

    Phys Ed

    French

    Industrial Arts

    Home Economics

    Career Internship

    Band

    Art/Drama

    Wide Area Network

    Art Mentorship

    Post Secondary Credits and Senior Years Dual Credits

    Distance Learning Courses

    Community Service

    Special Language Credit Option

    Private Music Option

    Challenge for Credit

 

General Entrance Requirements

University of Manitoba  (site)

University of Winnipeg  (site)

University of Brandon  (site)

 

 

CUSB  (site)

Red River College (site)

Winnipeg Technical College (site)

Assiniboine Community College (site)

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPC Senior Years Programs

 

 ENGLISH PROGRAM

To meet the requirements of this program, students must complete 30 credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12, all taught in English with the exception of other languages studied.

Students must complete 17 Compulsory credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.  These are:

  • English language arts – 4 credits
  • Mathematics – 4 credits
  • Social studies – 3 credits
  • Science – 2 credits
  • Physical education/health education  – 4 credits

Students must complete 13 optional credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.   At least one Optional credit must be at the Grade 11 level and at least two Optional credits must be at the Grade 12 level.  Optional credits can include:

  • courses based on department curricula
  • School-initiated Courses (SICs)
  • Student-initiated Projects (SIPs)
  • dual credits (university and college courses taken during the Senior Years)
  • distance learning
  • community service
  • Special Language Credit Option
  • Private Music Option

 

 

II    FRENCH IMMERSION PROGRAM

To meet the requirements of this program, students must complete 30 credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.  Of the 30 credits, a minimum of 14 credits from courses taught in French is required to obtain the provincial diploma in French Immersion.

  • In Grade 9, a minimum of 4 credits at the Grade 9 level are taught in French.
  • In Grade 10, a minimum of 4 credits at the Grade 10 level are taught in French.
  • In Grade 11, a minimum of 3 credits at the Grade 11 level are taught in French.
  • In Grade 12, a minimum of 3 credits at the Grade 12 level are taught in French.

 

Students must complete 21 compulsory credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.

These are:

  • Français langue seconde –  Immersion – 4 credits
  • English Language Arts – Immersion – 4 credits
  • Mathématiques (Mathematics) – 4 credits
  • Sciences humaines (Social Studies) – 3 credits
  • Sciences de la Nature (Science) – 2 credits
  • Éducation physique et Éducation à la santé (Physical Education/Health Education) – 4 credits

 

Students must complete 9 optional credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.  At least one optional credit must be at the Grade 11 level and at least one optional credit must be at the Grade 12 level.     Optional credits can include:

  • Courses based on department curricula
  • School-Initiated Courses (SICs)
  • Student-Initiated Projects (SIPs)
  • Dual credits (university and college courses taken during the Senior Years)
  • Distant learning
  • Community service
  • Special Language Credit Option
  • Private Music Option

 

 

III  Senior Years Technology Education Program

Technology Education includes the courses found in the subject areas of business and marketing education, industrial arts, vocational industrial arts and home economics.

Students must complete 30 credits from Grade 9 to Grade 12.

Students must complete 16 compulsory credits in total for the Technology Education Program.  These are:

–         English Language Arts – 4 credits

–         Mathematics – 4 credits

–         Social studies – 2 credits

(Grade 11 Social Studies is not a requirement for graduation from this program, but many students choose it as an option to meet the requirements for two diplomas)

–         Science  – 2 credits

–         Physical Education/Health Education – 4 credits

 

Students must complete 8 to 14 Technology Education credits from within an approved Senior Years Technology Education Program cluster, e.g. Business Education .  A cluster of technology education courses must be approved group of department developed and/or approved courses which facilitate the transition from school to work.   For St. Paul’s Collegiate, these courses may be in the areas of Human Services or Business Education.

Depending on the Technology Education cluster taken, the Optional Credits will vary from 0-6 in number.

 

 

IV   Career and Technology Studies

“co-creating learning opportunities” 

CTS is the Prairie Rose School Division’s response to Senior Years Technology Education.   CTS is a structural framework for assembling learning opportunities from both school and community resulting in highly individualized, flexible programming. Optional courses from Technology Education (Building Systems, Home Economics, and Business/ Computer Studies, Electronics) are combined with community-based “Career Internship”, and Career Development activity to create ‘Programs’.  Students subscribe to ‘programs’ based on their interests and career aspirations (at the Grade 11 or 12 level).  A program is made up of eight (8) option courses that serve to focus and develop the knowledge, skills, and experiences of students in a broad occupational area.   Learning opportunities combine community-based experience, in-school lab experience, and core subject classroom experiences resulting in increased student “technical literacy” and self-confidence.  All students may pursue a “Dual Diploma” (both English and Technology) by selecting option courses that follow patterns outlined in the program descriptions.

 

 

For more information: :http://ctsmb.blogspot.ca/

 

Management Skills 40S   ( l credit)

Management Skills 40S is a modularized course designed for teacher mediated self-study.  Participants progress through the modules at their own pace.   This credit involves both pre-employment orientation

(in-class, approximately 35 hrs.) and practicum (in-community at a site mutually agreed on by student and sponsor, approximately 75 hrs.) for a total of 110 hours.   This format is best suited for students who demonstrate the ability to be self-directed.   Attendance at a scheduled pre-employment sessions and seminars is compulsory.

Management Skills 40S provides an opportunity for students to prepare to apply personal knowledge and experience in a workplace setting which coincides with that student’s career/vocational interests.   The pre-employment orientation assists students in identifying the expectations of community based mentorship.  Real life experience provided through practicum serves to clarify career objectives, to establish professional relationship, and to develop employability skills.    This course is a pre-requisite to all other Career Internship credits.

 

 

 

 

 

V   High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP)

Another means to earn credit towards an apprenticeship is through the High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP). HSAP lets you start your apprenticeship training while you are still in high school. It combines regular high school instruction with paid, part-time, on-the-job training.

Benefits of HSAP & Starting your trade in high school

HSAP provides practical, paid, work experience and the opportunity to:

get hands-on experience using highly specialized, technological equipment
earn up to 8 supplemental academic credits for graduation based on 110 working hours per credit
obtain a financial incentive that covers tuition costs
apply your on-the-job training hours to continued, full-time apprenticeship training after graduation
use the skills you learn for a career in management or to start your own business

For more information:

http://www.gov.mb.ca/tce/apprent/apprentice/apprenticeship_hs.html

 

 

 

 

Dual Diploma

Students are eligible to graduate with a dual diploma High School Diploma (English/French Immersion) and High School Diploma (Senior Years Technology Education Program), if they successfully complete Grade 11 Social Studies in addition to the 14 compulsory credits (from an approved Senior Years Technology Education Program cluster) plus 5 Optional credits.

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

 

LANGUAGE ARTS

 

English 10F (ELA10F)  (1 credit)

All Sr. 1 students must take this course.  Time is divided between the continuous development of reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing and representing skills.  Written skills include the process of logical and clear explanation and description, correct grammatical structure, expression and the defence of thought.  Listening and oral skills are developed through discussion, and debate.  Through the use of novels, short stories, drama and poetry, we examine problems and themes that apply to living in society.  Students are encouraged to formulate and defend their own ideas which develop from the literature section of the course.

 

English 20F  (ENG20F) (1.5 credit)

(Course includes credit for Print Communication 25S)

All Grade 10 students must earn this credit to graduate. A variety of forms of text (short stories, novels, plays, film, poetry, articles) are used to help students develop both their analytical and creative skills. Terms related to language are studied in detail. Each student will produce a number of short assignments as well as an extensive development of a short story, a formal speech and an expository essay.

 

English 30S Comprehensive  (LAC30S) (1 credit)

This course addresses pragmatic (functional) and aesthetic (creative) purposes and texts in an approximate balance.  Student product will be approximately 50% pragmatic through exposition and analysis and 50% esthetic (creative) through creation and expression.

 

English 30S Transactional  (LAT30S) (1 credit)

The transactional focus uses text (materials) that are 70% pragmatic (functional) and 30% aesthetic (creative) with 100% of student output being pragmatic through explaining, analyzing, planning and presenting, informing and persuading.

 

English 40S  Transactional (ENG40S) (1 credit)

The emphasis in this course is on the transactional (language used to inform, explain, analyze, present and persuade). A variety of texts and articles will be used associated with career planning, business, research, novel, drama, and debating.

Learning outcomes are similar to the Grade 11 course.  However, the course content, processes, and skills utilized reflect a higher level of expectations for Grade 12 students.  As well, students must write a Provincial Exam which comprises 30% of their final mark.

*A skills portfolio must also be completed.

 

English 40S Comprehensive (ENG40S) (1 credit)

English Language Arts:  Comprehensive Focus

The direction and content of this course is similar to that of the Grade 11 course. However, an emphasis is on Canadian content.  Debating may also be offered in this course. Expectations and assessment will reflect that which is demanded of Grade 12 students. As above, students must write a Provincial Exam which comprises 30% of their final mark.

*A skills portfolio must also be completed.

 

Français 10F  (FRA10F) (1 credit)

Ce cours offre aux élèves  la possibilité de développer leur habiletés en compréhension orale et écrite ainsi qu’en production orale et écrite.  Les élèves feront l’étude de deux romans et de divers textes écrits et oraux.  En grammaire, ils font la revue des règles qu’il ont déja vues durant les années précédentes et ils sont introduits à celles qu’ils n’ont pas encore étudiées.

This course offers students the opportunity to develop their oral and written comprehension of the French language and their oral and written skills.  Students will study two novels and various other materials, both oral and written.  Skills in analyzing the written work (grammar, spelling, etc.) are emphasized.

 

Français 20F   (FRA20F) (1 credit)

Ce cours offre aux élèves la possibilité de devélopper leurs habiletés en compréhension orale et écrite ainsi qu’en production orale et écrite.  Les élèves étudieront une gamme de textes tels que des romans, des pièces de théatre, des textes documentaires, des courts articles, des poèmes, des dictées, des chansons et des textes ou lettres d’opinion.  Ils approfondiront leur connaissance des règles de grammaire.

This course offers students the opportunity to develop their oral and written comprehension of the French language as well at their oral and written skills.  Students will study  novels, plays, documentaries, brief reports, poems, spelling, songs and grammar.

 

Français 30S   (FRA30S)  (1 credit)

Ce cours offre aux élèves la possibilité d’élargir et d’approfondir leurs habiletés en compréhension orale et écrite ainsi qu’en production orale et écrite.  Les élèves seront capables d’intéragir avec une  gamme de textes, tels que des rapportages, des textes analytiques, des textes argumentatifs, des pièces de théâtre, des nouvelles littéraires et des romans.   Les élèves feront aussi une revue des règles de grammaire et d’orthographe.

This course offers students the opportunity to further develop their oral and written comprehension of the French language as well as their own oral and written skills.  Students will study a variety of materials such as reports, analytical essays, persuasive essays, plays, short stories, novels and will continue their review of grammar rules.

 

Français 40S (FRA40S)  (1 credit)

Ce cours offre aux élèves la possibilité d’élargir et d’approfondir leurs habiletés en compréhension orale et écrite ainsi qu’en production orale et écrite.  Les élèves seront capables d’intéragir avec une gamme de textes, tels que des reportages, des entrevues, des documentaires, des textes analytiques, des textes argumentatifs, des pièces de théâtre, des chansons, des nouvelles littéraires et des textes poétiques.  Les élèves écrivent un test provincial.

This course offers students the opportunity to further develop their oral and written comprehension of the French language as well as their own oral and written skills.   Students will study a variety of materials such as reports, interviews, documentaries, analytical essays, persuasive essays, plays, songs, short stories, novels and poetry.   Students will write a provincial exam.

 

 

MATHEMATICS

 

Mathematics 10F (MAT10F)  (1 credit)

Mathématiques 10F (MAQ10F) (1 credit)

This course is a required course for all Grade 9 students.  It is a general course, which will prepare the students for any of the three math courses in Grade 10.  It is built on seven interrelated curriculum processes:  reasoning, problem solving, estimation, mental math, communication, visualization, connections and technology.  Students will be exposed to varied interrelated experiences that encourage them to understand and appreciate the role of math in our society.

Topics include:

Square Roots and Surface Area                    Powers and Exponents

Linear Relations                                               Polynomials

Linear Equations and Inequalities                  Similarity and Transformations

Circle Geometry                                                Probability and Statistics

 

Students taking this course are required to have a scientific calculator and a geometry set.  Math concepts are learned through practice and regular homework.  Credit in this course is earned through class work, projects, assignments and tests.

Ce cours est un cours obligatoire pour tous les élèves de 9e  année. Il s’agit d’un cours général, ce qui préparera les étudiants à tous les trois cours de mathématiques de 10e  année. Il est construit sur sept programmes d’études des processus interdépendants: le raisonnement, la résolution de problèmes, l’estimation, mathématique mental, la communication, la visualisation, les connexions et la technologie. Les étudiants seront exposés à des expériences variées interdépendantes qui les encouragent à comprendre et à apprécier le rôle des mathématiques dans notre société.
Les sujets abordés comprennent:

 
Racines carrés et l’aire du surface                              Puissances et Exposants
Relations linéaires                                                         Polynômes
Équations linéaires et inégalités                                  Similarité et Transformations
Géométrie du cercle                                                      Probabilité et Statistique

Les étudiants qui suivent ce cours sont tenus d’avoir une calculatrice scientifique et un ensemble de géométrie. Les concepts de Mathé sont tirés de la pratique et de devoirs réguliers. Le crédit pour ce cours est gagné par le travail en classe, des projets, des devoirs et des tests.

 

 

Essential Mathematics 20S (EMA20S)  (1 credit)

 

Grade 10 Essential Mathematics (20S) is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. Grade 10 essential Mathematics (20S) is a one-credit course consisting of two half-credits each emphasizing consumer applications, problem solving, decision making, and spatial sense.

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Applied and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 20S (IAP20S) (1.5 credit)

(Course includes credit for Data Collection 25S)

Grade 10 Introduction to Applied and Pre-calculus Mathematics (20S) is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that require a math pre-requisite. This pathway provides students with the mathematical understanding and critical-thinking skills that have been identified for specific post-secondary programs of study. The topics studied form the foundation for topics to be studied in both Grade 11 Applied Mathematics and Grade 11 Pre-calculus Mathematics. Graphing calculators and other forms of technology will be explored but are not required for purchase.

Topics Include:

  1. Measurement
  2. Right Angle Trigonometry
  3. Factors and Products
  4. Roots and Powers
  5. Relations and Functions
  6. Linear Functions
  7. Systems of Linear Equations

Required material: Scientific Calculator

 

 

Applied Mathematics 30S (APM30S) (l credit)

The Applied Mathematics 30S Curriculum has been developed in response to society’s changing mathematical requirements.

The increased use of technology in society, the way in which information is communicated, and the manner in which students process information will be examined.

The course covers the following topic areas:

  • Quadratic Functions
  • Proofs
  • Trigonometry
  • Research Project
  • Scale
  • Systems of Inequalities

 

 

 

Essential Mathematics 30S (EMA30S) (1credit)

This course is designed to make students mathematically literate.   Students will be able to apply these math skills in their work lives and in their personal lives as citizens and consumers of goods and services.

The course covers the following topic areas:

  • Interest and Credit
  • Managing Money
  • Relations and Patterns
  • 3D Geometry
  • Design Modeling
  • Trigonometry
  • Statistics

 

 

 

 

Pre Calculus 30S  (PCA30S) ( 1 credit)

This course is designed for students who intend to study calculus and related mathematics as part of their post-secondary education. The course comprises, primarily, a high-level study of theoretical mathematics with an emphasis on problem solving, mental mathematics, as well as cumulative exercises and testing. Students are required to learn mathematical concepts through practice and regular homework.   Many of the questions and problems on exercises, test and examination are expected to be original or different from those presented in class.

Topics include:

  1. Quadratic Functions/Equation
  2. Radical Equations
  3. Non right angle Trigonometry
  4. Systems of Equations
  5. Inequalities
  6. Rational Equations

Required material: Scientific Calculator

 

 

Essential Mathematics  40S  (EMA40S) (1 credit)

The intent of this course is to equip students with the concrete, practical mathematical skills to function as effective consumer adults.  Students learn to make and support reasoned decisions, to solve problems, to communicate mathematically, and to use technology proficiently.

Specific units of study  include:

  • Statistics
  • Precision Measurement
  • Geometry and Trigonometry
  • Probability
  • Career Life
  • Home Finance
  • Vehicle Finance
  • Business Finance

 

Students will write a provincial exam.

 

Applied Mathematics 40S (APM40S) (1 credit)

The intent of this course is to provide students with a variety of mathematical experiences to enhance confidence, increase problem-solving ability, develop the ability to communicate mathematically, and increase their mathematical skill level.  Students will solve problems using a variety of forms of technology and will learn to use technology as a mathematical tool.

Specific units include:

  • Functions
  • Sinusoidal Functions
  • Research Project
  • Personal Finance
  • Logic
  • Probability
  • Permutations and Combinations
  • Design and Measurement

 

Regular testing and homework are an integral part of this course.

Students will write a provincial exam.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Calculus 40S  (PCA40S)  (1 credit)

The intent of this course is to expose students to varied mathematical experience to enhance their confidence, problem-solving ability, communication skills, and technical and theoretical skills at an advanced level. Regular testing and homework are integral parts of this course.

Topics include:

  1. Circular Functions
  2. Polynomial Functions
  3. Transformations
  4. Trigonometric Identities
  5. Exponents and Logarithms
  6. Permutations, Combination and Binomial Theorem

Required material: Scientific Calculator

 

 

 

SCIENCE

 

Sciences de la Nature 10F (SCN10F) (1 credit)  / Science 10F (SCI10F) (1 credit)

Le programme des sciences naturelles de Secondaire 1 présente un ensemble de thèmes et de concepts dans le domaine de la biologie, de la physique, de la chimie, et de la science de l’espace.  Certains de ces concepts seront étudiés en profondeur, mais les concepts scientifiques plus complexes seront l’objet d’études spécialisées au niveau secondaire.  Un des buts principaux de l’étude des sciences naturelles au niveau pré-sécondaire est d’entreprendre des études plus avancées au niveau secondaire.

Le programme des sciences de la  nature est basé sur l’éxpérience.  Il doit tenir compte non seulement du “quoi” mais aussi du “comment” dans l’enseignement des sciences. C’est aussi un programme qui passera donc des notions relativement simples à des notions plus complexes, du concret à l’abstrait.

Ce cours est divisé en 4 unités:

  1. Chimie – les atomes et les éléments et l’étude du tableau périodique
  2. Physique – la nature de l’éléctrostatique
  3. Biologie – la reproduction et la génétique
  4. L’Espace – l’exporation de l’Univers

 

The students will be introduced to biology, physics, chemistry and space sciences.

The program is based on experiments and experience.  Students must see not only the “what” but also the “how”. The program passes from relatively simple concepts to those which are more complex, from the concrete to the abstract.

This course is divided into 4 units:

  1. Chemistry – atoms, elements and the study of the periodic table
  2. Physics – the nature of electricity and electrostatics
  3. Biology- reproduction and genetics
  4. Space – exploration of the universe

 

Sciences de la Nature 20F (SCN20F) (1 credit)/ Science 20F (SCI20F) (1 credit)

Sciences de la Nature est un cours obligatoire pour tous les élèves de secondaire 2.   Le cours est construit autour du développement de compétence/habilités dans le domaine de la littérature scientifique, communication, résolution de problèmes, relation humaine et technologie.

Les unités sont:

  1. La dynamique des écosystèmes
  2. La chimie
  3. La physique du mouvement
  4. La dynamique métérologique

 

Science 20F is a mandatory course for all Grade 10 students.  The Science course has been designed to develop and emphasize foundation skills in the area of literacy and communication, problem-solving, human relations and technology.

The Grade 10 Science course consists of 4 units:

  1. Dynamics of Ecosystems
  2. Chemistry in Action
  3. The Physics of Motion
  4. Weather Dynamics

 

 

 

Current Topics in Science 30S (TSCI30S) (1 credit)

This course offers many hands on activities and opportunities to explore science related issues and topics. Students will have an opportunity to develop scientific literacy. Students will be exposed to a combination of science-related attitudes, skills, and knowledge to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision making abilities.

 

 

Biology 30S (BIO30S) (1 credit)

Biology 30S focuses on the various systems of the human body and how they interact with each other. Units include structure and function.

1)      Wellness and Homeostasis – an overview of how the body maintains balance

2)      Digestion and Nutrition – how the body acquires energy and building materials

3)   Transportation and Respiration – how materials are sent throughout the body

4)      Excretion and Waste Management – How waste materials are removed

5)      Protection and Control – How the body fights diseases and parasites

6)      Wellness and Homeostatic Changes – what happens as the body ages

 

 

Biology 40S/Biologie40S (BIO/BII40S) (1 credit)

Prerequisites:  Biology 30S is not required, however it is recommended.

The core units are:

1)  Ecology

2)  Genetics

3) Taxonomy: The Five Kingdoms of Life (plants, animals, bacteria, fungi and protists)

Although this course has a heavy content component, a great deal of emphasis is placed upon lab work and cooperative learning.  Research skills are important and some project work will be assigned.  Students will have the opportunity to “practice” science.

Pré-requis: Biologie 30S n’est pas nécessaire, cependant il est recommandé.
Les unités de base sont:
1) Écologie
2) Génétique
3) Taxonomie: Les Cinq Royaumes de la vie (plantes, animaux, bactéries, champignons et protistes)
Bien que ce cours a une forte composante de contenu, beaucoup d’accent est mis sur le travail de laboratoire et l’apprentissage coopératif. Compétences en matière de recherche sont importants et certains travaux et projets seront donnés.

 

Chemistry 30S (CHE30S)  ( 1 credit)

Chemistry 30S is designed to build on what students know and are able to do as a result of their studies in Science 10F and Senior Science 20F. Students will learn the facts, formulas, and principles that make up the high school chemistry curriculum.

The Grade 11 Chemistry 30S course consists of five units:

1) Gases and the atmosphere

2) Physical Properties of matter

3) Chemical Reactions

4) Solutions

5) Organic Chemistry.

 

 

 

Chemistry 40S  (CHE40S) (1 credit)

This course is required or suggested for entrance into the facilities of Agriculture, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Engineering, Home Economics, Medical Rehabilitation, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy.  It is strongly recommended for entrance into the Faculty of Science.

Prerequisites:  Chemistry 30S

Contents:  A thorough investigation of:

1)      Kinetics

2)      Chemical Equilibrium

3)      Acid-base Equilibrium

4)      Solubility Equilibria

5)      Oxidation- Reduction

 

 

Physics 30S   (PHY30S)   ( 1 credit)

Physics is the study of relationships between matter and energy in the world and the universe.   This course takes an introductory look at Waves; Mechanics; and Fields.

Equation solving and equation manipulation skills will be required.   The goal of the course will be to use observations and theories to predict outcomes for future interactions.

Outline:

Kinematics – The study of movement

Dynamics – The study of forces

Waves – The study of sound, light and radio waves

Fields – The study of magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic fields

 

Applied and/or Pre-Calculus math recommended

 

 

Physics 40S   (PHY40S)   ( 1 credit)

Physics is the study of relationships between matter and energy in the world and the universe.

This course will examine, at a higher level:

Mechanics (lD & 2D motion); Dynamics (centripetal force, energy and work)

Fields (exploring space, orbits & electromagnetism)

Electricity (DC circuits and EM induction) and

Medical Physics (nuclear radiation and applications)

 

It is strongly recommended that students first complete Physics 30S as a lot of the material directly builds on the grade 11 work.

Applied  and/or Pre-Calculus math recommended

 

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

Social Studies 10F (SOC10F) (1 credit)

In Grade 9 Social Studies, we focus on Canada in the Contemporary World. Students will develop skills for active democratic citizenship, managing information and ideas, critical and creative thinking, and communication. These skills will be developed through strategies that promote collaboration, decision-making, the organization and collection of data, constructing and interpreting maps, expressing, accepting, and analyzing different opinions, as well as presenting information in a variety of formats.

The following units will be studied and have a both a knowledge and value based component:

  1. Diversity and Pluralism in Canada
  2. Democracy and Governance in Canada
  3. Canada in the Global Context
  4. Canada: Opportunities and Challenges

 

 

Sciences Humaines 10G (SCH10G) (1 credit)

Le Canada dans le monde contemporain

Les élèves de secondaire 1 explorent les possibilités et les enjeux du Canada contemporain en examinant les éléments démographiques, politiques, sociaux et culturels du pays. Les élèves considèrent diverses perspectives sur une variété de questions telles que les idéaux démocratiques et les droits de la personne, la présence et l’influence francophones, l’autonomie gouvernementale autochtone, le multiculturalisme, la sécurité sociale et la qualité de vie, les relations majoritaires – minoritaires, les médias de masse et le rôle du Canada dans le monde. En étudiant les interactions et institutions qui façonnent la société canadienne, les élèves participent à des discussions sur la culture et l’identité au Canada. Ils explorent également ce que signifie pour eux la citoyenneté canadienne et réfléchissent sur les principaux facteurs qui influent sur leur identité. Au cours de cette enquête, les élèves enrichiront leur compréhension de la citoyenneté et de l’identité dans le contexte communautaire, canadien et mondial. Les élèves seront ainsi mieux en mesure de devenir des citoyennes ou citoyens informés, actifs et responsables dans une démocratie pluraliste.

Dans ce document, les résultats d’apprentissage spécifiques pour secondaire 1 sont présentés selon les quatre regroupements thématiques suivants :

  1. Diversité et pluralisme au Canada;
  2. Démocratie et gouvernement au Canada;
  3. Le Canada dans le contexte mondial;
  4. Les possibilités et défis de l’avenir canadien.

 

Geographical Issues 20F (GEO20F) (1 credit)

In Geographic Issues of the 21st Century, students focus on a variety of issues and challenges of the contemporary world. Students study concepts related to ownership and development of natural resources, production and distribution of food, development of industry and trade, and increasing urbanization. Students consider these issues in the context of Canada, North America, and the world.

 

Géographie 20F (GEI20F) (1 credit)

Ce cours permettra aux élèves de se situer sur le plan local, national et mondial. Le but est d’amener les élèves à devenir des citoyens et citoyennes actifs, soucieux des valeurs démocratiques et engagés à contribuer à la réalisation d’une société meilleure.

Ce cours est divisé en 4 unités:

1)      La littératie géographique

2)      Les ressources naturelles

3)      La Terre nourricière

4)      L’industrie et le commerce

5)      Les espaces urbains

 

This course will enable the students to understand their roles as citizens of their community, their country and the world. The goal is to help students become active citizens conscious of democratic values and committed to contribute to society in a positive way.

The following clusters will be studied:

1)      Geographic literacy

2)      Natural Resources

3)      Agriculture

4)      Industry and Commerce

5)      Urban space

 

 

History 30S (HIS30S) (1 credit)

History of Canada

The intent of this course is to examine the historical development of Canada, with a focus on social and political history.  A further intent is to examine the way in which Canada’s history has developed and is developing within an international context:  that is, the relationships between Canadian and world issues, where appropriate.  The following themes will be explored:

  1. Aboriginals Peoples and Diversity in Canada
  2. New France and European Colonization
  3. Road to Confederation
  4. Canada at war
  5. Post-War Canada

 

Histoire 30S (HII30S)  (1 credit)

Ce cours est l’étude de l’histoire du Canada en six modules:

  1. Les Autochtones et la diversité au Canada
  2. La Nouvelle France et la colonization Européene
  3. La rue à Confédération
  4. Le Canada en guerre
  5. Le Canada d’après-guerre

In this course the history of Canada is broken down into six following modules:

 

  1. Aboriginals Peoples and Diversity in Canada
  2. New France and European Colonization
  3. Road to Confederation
  4. Canada at war
  5. Post-War Canada

 

 

 

Physical Geography 30S  (GEO30S) (1 credit)

Physical Geography is a survey course, providing an introduction to the broad field of physical geography. The curriculum documents, representative of the time period, reflected a highly descriptive approach to the study of physical geography. General topics include:

– the solar system, Earth, time and seasons

– spheres of the Earth and Earth materials

– diastrophism and mass wasting processes

– oceans, currents and waves

– elements of weather and climate

– world climate, vegetation and soil regions

 

The contemporary approach to physical geography education emphasizes the nature of earth systems and their interactions with each other and with humans, ecological patterns, environmental issues, and the limitations that the physical world places on human activities and, in turn, the impact of human activities on the physical world. When considered within this new approach, the study of physical geography is both timely and relevant in view of the global challenges facing humankind on Planet Earth.

Major Topics

The current recommended student and teacher resources (Earth Matters, see below) reflect this new approach to physical geography. These resources contain the following units:

Unit 1: The Earth: A Vibrant Planet

Unit 2: The Ground Beneath our Feet: Understanding the Lithosphere

Unit 3: The Water all Around: Understanding the Hydrosphere

Unit 4: The Air Above: Understanding the Atmosphere

Unit 5: All That is Living: Understanding the Biosphere

 

 

Social Studies 40S (SOC40S) (1 credit)

“Global Issues”

The primary intent of this course is to analyze the impact of contemporary world issues on the quality of human life in a variety of different political, social and economic systems throughout the world.  The intent is to examine the historical background, the present situation, and the future implications of such global concerns as terrorism, human rights, population, resources, militarism, poverty and ideological conflict.  A further intent is to explore a variety of alternative ways in which these issues can be viewed and to encourage students to make an informed response about the issue in the world  in which they live.  Also, throughout the study, students will be encouraged to examine critically how the media presents major issues of the world. The following themes will be explored:

1)      Role of the Media

2)      Quality of life in societies with different political, economic and social systems and different stages of development (ex. Communism, Fascism)

3)      The global, geographic and political organization of the world, and the interdependence of societies and nations since World War II.

4)      Selected major world issues and their implications in the developed and less developed world. (ex. Terrorism, human rights, population explosion)

5)      Implications for the future of continuing trends and alternatives to these present trends.

 

Sciences Humaines 40S (SCH40S) (1 credit)

“Problèmes Mondiaux”

Objectifs du cours actuel

Les élèves pourront :

– acquérir une meilleure compréhension des enjeux mondiaux actuels

– étudier les conséquences historiques, contemporaines et futures des enjeux mondiaux

– analyser les répercussions des problèmes mondiaux sur la qualité de vie au sein de divers

systèmes politiques et socioéconomiques

– explorer diverses perspectives sur des enjeux mondiaux

– développer des opinions éclaircies et informées sur des problèmes mondiaux

 

Le cours est divisé en cinq modules :

Module I : Le rôle des médias dans les enjeux mondiaux (3 semaines)

Module II : Répartition mondiale: Est-Ouest et Nord-Sud (4 semaines)

Module III : Qualité de vie (4 semaines)

Module IV: Des problèmes mondiaux (6 semaines)

Module V: Le monde de l’avenir (2 semaines)

 

 

Psychology 40S (PSY40S) (1 credit)

This course exposes students to the major topics found in the field of psychology. It also emphasizes the issues that are of particular direct interest and relevance to students completing high school. Students explore the scientific methods upon which psychology is based. They can then apply what they learned to their daily lives.

Why Study Psychology?

Studying psychology gives students lifelong skills such as dealing with issues proactively, solving problems, learning, and nurturing healthy relationships. It helps students understand themselves, and deal with issues in their own lives such as inner conflicts, relationships with parents and peers, and intimacy. It also helps students understand societal problems like addiction, violence, and prejudice.

 

 

 

                                                                                                               

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Physical Education 10F (PED10F) (1 credit)

The Physical Education program concentrates on teaching techniques and skills on various sports:  soccer, volleyball, badminton, track & field and fastball.  Emphasis is also placed on achieving and maintaining a higher level of fitness.  This is the part of the program that should be done at home to maximize the best results.

There is also a classroom health component dealing with various current topics such as social and emotional well being, physical well being, dental hygiene, safety and first aid, nutrition, and community health.

It is also hoped that students will remain active both in school and out of school through programs that help maintain their personal fitness level as well as their social growth.

 

Physical Education 20F (PED20F) (1 credit)

The Physical Education program at St. Paul’s Collegiate places an emphasis on active participation and the principles of fair play and good sportsmanship.   The Physical Education program focuses on five essential learning outcomes, as outlined by Manitoba’s K-S4 Physical Education/Health Education curriculum.

  1. Movement
  2. Fitness Management
  3. Safety
  4. Personal and Social Management
  5. Healthy Lifestyle Practices

Students are expected to change into proper attire of Phys. Ed. Class.  This should include running shoes, t-shirt or sweatshirt, short or sweatpants, or tracksuit. Some of the activities students may participate in as part of the Physical Education program include touch football, ultimate, volleyball, basketball, badminton, low-organized games, soccer, track and field, fitness testing, baseball/softball, golf, curling, floor hockey, team handball, soft lacrosse, first aid/CPR, touch rugby, and weight training.

 

Dance 20F/30F/40F (Dance20F/30F/40F) (1 credit)

The purpose of this course is for students to learn the value of the arts. This course is physically enduring as a variety of different dance forms are taught. Students learn moves from genres such as ballroom, hip hop, tap, jazz, ballet, bollywood, and so on. Students are marked on their daily participation and efforts in class.

Physical Education 30F    (Active Healthy Lifestyles) (PED30F) (1 credit)

This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures.  Students will study topics related to fitness management, mental health, substance use and abuse prevention, and the social impact of sport.    The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning.  These topics will make up the core 25% IN-class component of the course content.  Students will be required to develop and implement the remaining 75% of the course on their own time in a personal physical activity plan as part of the physical activity practicum.    Students will be introduced to safety and risk management planning to minimize the associated risks of the activities they have chosen.

As part of earning a credit for this course, students will be required to submit a personal fitness portfolio containing elements such as a fitness plan, physical activity  log, or journal entries.   Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or In-complete designation.

Note :   Parents/guardians will be required to review the student’s physical activity plan and sign a Parental Declaration and Consent For acknowledging their approval of the chosen activities and acceptance of the responsibility for risk management, safety, and supervision.  Parents/guardians will also be required to verify the entries of the student’s physical activity  log through a sign-off procedure.

 

Physical  Education 40F  (Active Healthy Lifestyles) (PED40F) (1 credit)

This compulsory full credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures.   Students will study topics related to fitness management, nutrition, sexual health, social/emotional health, and personal development.   The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning.   These topics will make up the core 25% IN-class component of the course content.   For the remaining 75% of the course, students will required to develop and implement, on their own time, a personal physical activity plan as part of a physical activity practicum.  Students will be introduced to risk management planning to minimize the associated risks of the activities they have chosen.

As part of earning a credit of this course, students will be required to submit a personal fitness portfolio containing elements such as a fitness plan, physical activity log, or journal entries. Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or In-complete designation.

Note :   Parents/guardians will be required to review the student’s physical activity plan and sign a Parental Declaration and Consent For acknowledging their approval of the chosen activities and acceptance of the responsibility for risk management, safety, and supervision. Parents/guardians will also be required to verify the entries of the student’s physical activity  log through a sign-off procedure.

 

 

Interdisciplinary Sciences (IDSC40S) (1 credit)

This course was developed to make students aware of the environment around them, to develop problem solving skills and community through experiential learning.  Students will explore a variety of theoretical and practical topics in and outside the classroom for example; wilderness survival skills, fire starting methods, outdoor cooking methods, low impact camping, hypothermia, snow shoeing, shelter construction, canoeing and climbing.

 

 

 

 

FRENCH

 

French 10G  (FRE10G)  (1 credit)

Purpose: 

To extend the student’s vocabulary.  The student is expected to do more work on his own.  The emphasis is on building a strong vocabulary base.   As well the student continues to refine his/her pronunciation skills, his comprehension skills and his written skills.

N.B.  All students of French should have their own French-English dictionaries.

Recommended editions are:

  1. 1. Larousse French-English Dictionary
  2. Cassell’s New Compact French-English Dictionary

 

French 20G (FRE20G) (l credit)

Texts:  Passages 3, Voyages 1

The French course is designed for students of English background.  Students of French background are advised to take Français 20G.  At the Senior Level the French Course is based on The Passages program.  Each student is also expected to read a number of novels at his/her level.  It is hoped that through this program the student:

  1. will develop the ability to speak French;
  2. will develop the ability to read and understand French;
  3. will achieve some degree of competence in writing French;
  4. will gain more knowledge about French Canada;
  5. a)  its culture b)  its way of thinking

The Grade 10 level of the program will seek to maintain the emphasis on listening and speaking skills developed in the previous six years.  In addition more attention will be given to reading and writing.  There will be a 50-50 split between listening/speaking and reading/writing skills. Emphasis will be on developing skills in communication in a variety of situations.  This course will lead to French 30G and 40G creating an excellent base for the study of French as a second Language after graduation.   Bilingualism is not an objective of this program.

 

French 30S (FRE30S)  (1 credit)

Texts:  Voyages 1 & 2

In French 30S the student will be developing his/her skills in oral/aural comprehension. Extensive work will be done in speaking skills.  Also, some development of the written and reading skills will be continued.

Prerequisite: French 20S

 

French 40S (FRE40S)   (1 credit)

French 40S continues to develop the student’s oral, aural, comprehension, reading and writing skills.  The emphasis is on speaking but quite an amount of time is spent on reading and writing skills.  At the end of the French 40S, the student will not be bilingual but will be fairly conversant in French.  As well he/she will have an excellent base to continue  French studies.

 

 

 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS

Woodworking 10G  (IAR10G)   (1 credit)

This course is a study in woodworking and the processes involved.   The course is designed to promote problem-solving skills and help students acquire the skills necessary to be able to contribute to society.    Emphasis will be placed on planning and designing stages with students demonstrating the various skills through projects.   Topics of study include:

1)      Introduction/Safety

2)      Hand Tools

3)      Power Tools

4)   Measurement

5)   Planning a project

6)   Joinery

7)   Wood Finishing

 

 

 

Woodworking Technology 20G  (WTE20G)  (1 credit)

This course is a study in woodworking and the processes involved.  The course is designed to promote problem-solving skills and help students acquire the skills necessary to be able to contribute to society.  Emphasis will be placed on planning and designing stages with students demonstrating the various skills through projects.  It is strongly recommended that students take Woodworking 15G before signing up for this course.

Units of Study

1) Introduction/Safety

2) Power Tools

3) Measurement

4) Planning a project

5) Joinery

6) Wood Finishing

 

 

Power Mechanics 20S   (SME20S)  (1 credit)

 

This course is intended to prepare students to meet entry-level requirements in the field of small engine mechanics.   This includes theory, diagnosis, repair, overhaul and maintenance of small engines used on lawn mowers, garden tractors, and other small equipment.   Included in this study of small engines is carburetion and electrical systems, engine overhaul and tune-up, and belt, chain, and direct driver power systems.   Throughout the entire course an emphasis is placed on safe and accepted shop techniques used throughout the small engine powered equipment industry.

 

This course is for students who like working with their hands and figuring out how things work.   Small engine mechanics build, maintain, and repair all kinds of small engines, from the ones that power chainsaws to those that propel fishing boats.   While these engines may be smaller than a standard car or truck engine, they work in basically the same way, and require many of the same skills to repair.

 

 

Woodworking Technology 30G  (IAR30G)   (1 credit)

 

Woodworking 30G is a hands-on based course. Emphasis is this course will be placed on the ability to problem-solve, attention to detail, and safety in the lab. It is strongly recommended that students who choose to take this course, should have previously taken Woodworking 15G.

 

Topics include:

1) Safety

2) Measurement

3) Project Planning

4) Cabinet Making

5) Finishing

 

 

Construction Technology 40S/Manufacturing Technology 40S (   ) (1 credit)

This course is intended to expose students to the world of construction.  Students will use skills acquired from previous courses and put them into practice in a real world work environment.

Students will collaborate with classmates to design and build projects.  Projects will vary from year to year depending on demand.  In addition to learning more about construction, students will learn valuable teamwork, communication and problem solving skills.

 

 

Applied Technology 40S (ATCH40S) (1credit)

Students develop problem solving skills by working individually and in teams to solve practical engineering problems. They will design, build and test solutions they have planned and constructed. (Example: Bridge Construction, CO2 Cars, Hydraulic Robotics)

Students will develop knowledge of the correct use of tools and develop individual talents and aptitudes. They will learn to manage time, develop safe work habits and practice technical, process and production skills that variously incorporate: planning, marketing, designing, fabricating and evaluating. They will manipulate tools, materials and processes in disciplines of technology

 

 

Power Mechanics 20S    (SME20S)  (1 credit)

 

This course is intended to prepare students to meet entry-level requirements in the field of small engine mechanics.   This includes theory, diagnosis, repair, overhaul and maintenance of small engines used on lawn mowers, garden tractors, and other small equipment.   Included in this study of small engines is carburetion and electrical systems, engine overhaul and tune-up, and belt, chain, and direct driver power systems.   Throughout the entire course an emphasis is placed on safe and accepted shop techniques used throughout the small engine powered equipment industry.

 

This course is for students who like working with their hands and figuring out how things work.   Small engine mechanics build, maintain, and repair all kinds of small engines, from the ones that power chainsaws to those that propel fishing boats.   While these engines may be smaller than a standard car or truck engine, they work in basically the same way, and require many of the same skills to repair.

 

 

 

 

HOME ECONOMICS

 

Foods & Nutrition 10G (FNU10G) (1 credit)

Nutrition is basic to health. Foods and Nutrition 10G looks at the food intake patterns of teenagers. Snacking habits, Canadian Food Traditions and optimum physical and mental health are examined.  Students have many practical experiences preparing healthy foods

 

Family Studies 15G (FST15G) (.5 credit)

This course provides students with an opportunity to:

– develop skills that will assist them in establishing Canada’s future families

– recognize the value families serve in society

– develop communication, decision-making and conflict resolution skills

– appreciate various ethnic and cultural lifestyles

 

 

Clothing/Housing & Design 15G (CHD15G) (.5 credit)

This course gives information on fibers and fabric – their construction, properties and the care needed. A textile project is made using a sewing machine and serger. Elements and principles of design are taught and incorporated into a housing project. Consumerism and careers are also explored.

 

Foods and Nutrition 20G (FNU20G) (1 credit)

Do you like to experiment with new cooking techniques?  Do you like to try new foods?   If so, this course is for you.  This course examines the significance of food in student’s daily lives.  Students will explore how food plays a part of a healthy lifestyle.  Students will evaluate and apply consumer information in the food industry. A special component of this course is the study of culture and food.  Through the practical component of this course, Students will gain skills in Basic as well as more advanced cooking techniques.

 

Clothing, Housing and Design 20G (CHD20G) (1 credit)

Do you like to design your own projects. work with your hands, have fun while learning?  This practical, hands-on course examines each of the three areas:  clothing, housing and design.   The course examines clothing and personality, cultural clothing and fashion, design elements and principles, housing needs and priorities, housing through the life cycle and clothing, housing and design in society.

 

Family Studies 20F (FST20G) (1 credit)

Are you interested in a career in teaching, child care, social work or the medical profession? This course is an introduction in the study of child development including physical, emotional, intellectual and social development from conception to toddler years. The Baby simulator is a major component of this course.  The curriculum and parenting simulation together form a powerful tool to give the insightful picture of the skills required to effectively care for a child.

 

Family Studies 30S  (FAMS30S) (1 credit)

The intent of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to create safe, nurturing environments for children. The emphasis at this level is on the school-aged child.

 

Family Studies 40S  (FAMS 40S) (1 credit)

Family Studies 40S provides skills and knowledge in the areas of parenting, human development, money management, relationships, and the well being of individuals and families. Throughout the life cycle.

 

Foods & Nutrition 30S   (FNU30S) (1 credit)

This course focuses on the importance of making healthy food choices, to promote the well being of individuals and families.  The first unit of study examines the food supply and the role the food industry plays in the food we consume.  Students are provided with many hands on experience in preparing nutritious food, which correspond to their unit of study.

 

Foods & Nutrition 40S   (FNU40S) (1 credit)

The topic of food and nutrition is divided into eight major concepts or topics: significance of food, consumer aspects of food and nutrition, family aspects of food and health, Canada’s food supply, Canadian food practices, global food issues, careers in food, and planning, preparing, and serving meals.

Topics of Study include:

– Healthy Everyday Meals

– Achieving Wellness

– You’re On Your Own

– Planning, Preparing and Serving Food

 

 

 

BUSINESS EDUCATION

 

Applying Information and Communication Technology I 15F    (ICTI 15F) (.5 credit) 

(Included in the course work for Life Works Exploration 10S)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to expand upon previously learned Information and Communication Technology skills. Students will use productivity software to meet a variety of project outcomes, such as the creation of documents, spreadsheets, web pages and presentations.

 

Applying Information and Communication Technology II 15F    (ICTII 15F) (.5 credit) 

(Included in the course work for Life Works Planning 20S)

The purpose of the course is to make the students familiar with the following productivity tools: word processing, data management, spreadsheets, presentations, and introduce them to basic programming.

 

Digital Pictures 25F (DPI25F) (.5 credit)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to convey a message through original digital photography. Students will capture still images with a digital camera and use Adobe Photoshop to manipulate their photo work and present in presentations and video stories.

 

Print Communications 25F  (PCD25F) (.5 credit)

(Included in the course work for English Language Arts 20F)

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to plan and create documents for personal and business communications.

 

 

Digital Filmmaking 25S (DFI25S)  (.5 credit)

 

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to tell stories by combining sounds, still images, moving images, test, graphics, and animation into a video project.   Students will plan, develop and produce a video project using computer software.

 

 

 

 

Career Development: Life Works Exploration 10S (LWE10S) (1.5 credit)

(Course includes credit for Applying Information and Communication Technology I 15F)

This course is designed to connect school learning with workplace and labour market realities. The course will help students acquire and apply the knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions for life, work and the essential post-secondary education/training that is required in today’s economy.

Outline:

  • Personal Management
  • Career Exploration
  • Learning and Planning
  • Job Seeking and Job Maintenance
  • Career and Community Experiences

 

 

 

 

 

Career Development: Life Works Planning 20S (LWE20S) (1.5 credit)

(Course includes credit for Applying Information and Communication Technology II 15F)

The learning experiences in this unit provide students knowledge and skills to help build and maintain a positive self-image and learn how self-image influences their lives. The theme assists students developing the knowledge and skills necessary for effective communication, teamwork, and leadership. The students will learn to build successful relationships in all aspects of their lives. This section also helps students discover and learn how to respond to change and personal growth as they pass through the various stages of their lives. These personal management skills are needed for success in work, learning, and life.

Outline:

  • Personal Management
  • Career Exploration
  • Learning and Planning
  • Job Seeking and Job Maintenance
  • Career and Community Experiences

 

 

Futures in Business 15G  (FUB15G) (.5 credit)

Futures in Business provides an awareness of opportunities in business and develops an understanding of the importance of business concepts. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills and knowledge that will enable them to: communicate effectively, keep accurate records, plan personal goals, and be alert to future opportunities in business

 

 

Start Your Own Business 25G (STB25G) (.5 credit)

This course is designed to contribute to the growth and development of students and to emphasize skills that will assist young people plan and start small businesses.  This is important because small business owners constitute one of Canada’s most valuable economic resources.

Small business ownership offers the opportunity for young people to develop and promote skills, hobbies, talents, and ideas.   Ideally, this course should incorporate current technology. Successful completion of the course will result in the development of a business plan.

 

 

Accounting Principles 30S (ACC30S)  (1 credit)

Textbook: Principles of Accounting

This course is designed to be an overview of accounting systems and related data processing principles.  The course is recommended for all students, whether they are entering the business world or not, as it gives them an insight into how a business is run.

Major topics:

  • The Balance Sheet
  • Balance Sheet Accounts
  • Income Statement
  • Journal and Ledger
  • Worksheet and Classified Financial Statements
  • Adjusting and Closing Entries
  • Cash Control and Banking

 

 

Accounting Systems 40S (ACC40S)  ( 1 credit)

Textbook:  Principles of Accounting

In depth study of alternate business systems, special methods of journalizing, and special fields of accounting, payroll, budgeting, taxation, partnership, corporation, and cost accounting. The Simply Accounting software will be part of the course load.

 

Law 40S (LAW40S) (1 credit)

Law is offered to students who wish to acquire some knowledge of Canadian Law as it applies to business transactions and private affairs.  The course will cover aspects of the law dealing with criminal and civil law, family law, and law dealing with contracts, insurance, work and other areas of interest to students.  Students will be required to learn some laws and to make decisions on different cases based on their knowledge of the law. This course should help the student recognize those situations where it is wiser for him/her to obtain professional legal advice.  It should also help students develop logical thinking to analyze a legal situation without bias.

Workload:  1)  assigned readings in textbook      2)  case studies          3)  workbook assignments

4)  independent research                    5)  group projects       6)  unit tests

 

 

 

BAND

 

Band Music 10G (BAN10G) (1 Credit)

This instrumental music (band) program offers students the opportunity to play a musical instrument in a group setting.  The program focuses on group performance, both in the classroom and in community concerts.  Students also gain an appreciation and knowledge of many musical styles through the band repertoire studied, which ranges from classical to popular compositions.  Studies may also include the writing of music and other technicalities of music making.

 

Band Music 20S ( BAN20S)  (1 credit)

The instrumental music program allows students to continue the band experience on a richer, more rewarding level.   The program continues to focus on group performance, both in the classroom and in the community.  Students also gain a greater appreciation of form and style.

(prerequisite: Gr.7, 8, S1 instrumental music)

 

Band Music 30S (BAN30S) (1 credit)

 

The instrumental music program allows students to continue the band experience on a richer, more rewarding level.   The program continues to focus on group performance, both in the classroom and in the community.  Students also gain a greater appreciation of form and style.

(prerequisite: Gr. 7, 8, S1, S2 instrumental music)

 

Band Music 40S (BAN40S)  (1 credit)

 

The instrumental music program allows students to continue the band experience on a richer, more rewarding level.  The program continues to focus on group performance, both in the classroom and in the community.  Students also gain a greater appreciation of form and style.

(prerequisite: Gr. 7, 8, S1, S2, S3 instrumental music)

 

Jazz Band   (.5 credit)

Jazz Band 15S, 25S, 35S, 45S

 

After school program, once per week.

 

 

ART/DRAMA

Visual Arts 10F/20F (ART 10/20F) (1 credit)

These courses are a general introduction to the subject of art. Students will learn about the elements of design through various in class assignments. Students will be exposed to a number of different mediums and techniques such as pencil sketching, charcoal and acrylic paint. Students will also explore line, value, space, color, and design. Students will also be exposed to established artist and works in art history.

 

Drama 10G (DRAM10G) (1 credit)

The overall goal of drama is to foster a positive self-concept in students by encouraging them to explore life by assumption of roles and by the acquisition of dramatic skills. Successful drama students find themselves gaining self confidence in situations that require them to speak publicly. Students will develop an appreciation of drama and theatre as a process and art form.

 

 

WIDE AREA NETWORK COURSES

Course offerings are dependant on student interest divisionally.

 

 

 

ART MENTORSHIP   

 

Basic Studio 30S  (STU30S)  (1 credit)

Artists living and practicing in the community mentor students.  Students explore communication and technique using a variety of art mediums including drawing, painting (acrylic) pottery (sculpture), and watercolor.

 

Advanced Studio 40S   (1 credit)

Students develop individual interests and skills in various and combined mediums under the guidance of local artists.   Emphasis is on the process involved in artifact development, from inception, through research, production, and reflection.     Marketing and entrepreneurship is a consideration at this level.

 

Portfolio Management 40S   (1 credit)

The portfolio is intended to convey the natural aptitudes, initiative, persistence, and enthusiasm of the artist.   Ability to express oneself in visual form and to reflect on the development of ones own skills and sensibilities is paramount.

 

Advanced Design Studio 40S  (1 credit)

 

 

 

Post Secondary Credits and Senior Years – Dual Credits

  • Senior Years students may take college and university courses for Senior Years graduation credits, for example, Introduction to Psychology (university course) and Safety in the Workplace (college course).
  • The student receives a high school credit as well as a university /college credit.
  • Students can earn a maximum of five dual credits.
  • The decision to participate is a school, or a school division decision and funding is also a local matter.
  • Parents need to consider that some courses at the post-secondary level may not be accepted equally by all of Manitoba post secondary institutions or those beyond Manitoba

 

Please refer to the Guidelines for Post Secondary Credits and Senior Years (Dual Credits) at:

http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/ks4/policy/gradreq/choice-guidelines.html

 

 

 

Distance Learning Courses

Students may take Compulsory or Optional courses in either print or online format including courses delivered from outside the province.    Two documents on distance learning were recently sent to Manitoba schools.

 

These documents are available online at:     http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/ks4/docs/policy/online_learning

 

Community Service

Students may earn one Community Service credit (in the form of a SIP) within the 30 credits for graduation.

Credit of community service activities will be given not simply for participation in an activity, or for the amount of time spent in an activity, but for the achievement of an educational purpose.

Guidelines for this SIP have been sent to schools.   Parents are encouraged to read the guidelines and the parents approval form for this credit at:

http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/ks4/policy/gradreq/choice-attachb.pdf

 

 

Special Language Credit Option

Provides for the recognition of Manitoba’s linguistic diversity. Students proficient in languages other than English or French are eligible. Only one special language credit may be earned at each of the Senior Years.

 

The Private Music Option

Open to students who have successfully obtained standing in the Conservatory Canada Program or Royal Conservatory of Toronto starting at the grade level for instrument or voice.   One credit may be earned at each of the Senior Years.

 

Challenge for Credit

The Challenge for Credit Option offers students the opportunity to apply prior knowledge in a particular subject area by demonstrating achievement in the learning outcomes of that course/specialty and receive credit for it.

For information on the Challenge for Credit option refer to:

 

http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/ks4/policy/gradreq/choice-attacha.pdf